Would you like to participate in a research study for an investigational medication for the treatment of atopic eczema?

We are inviting you to take part in a research study for adults living with moderate to severe atopic eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis.

The research study will be conducted at about 15 study centers in several countries across Europe. You will visit a study center approximately 17 times, which includes three overnight stays, over about 26 weeks during your participation. You will not have to pay for any study-related visits, tests, or the study drug. Study participants can be reimbursed for their travel costs and participation, where locally acceptable.

The UP0089 Study is being done to assess how well an investigational medication works to treat patients with moderate to severe atopic eczema for whom previous treatments have not worked sufficiently.

You may qualify for the UP0089 Study if you:

  • Are between 18 and 65 years old
  • Have atopic eczema that covers at least 10% of your body (the palm of your hand is approximately 1% of your body’s surface area) and have had atopic eczema for at least 1 year
  • Have tried a topical (applied to the skin) atopic eczema treatment and have not had a sufficient response (your symptoms did not improve by at least 50%) OR you have been advised against using topical atopic eczema treatments.
Participants can be reimbursed for their travel costs and participation, where locally acceptable.
Participate
Participate
Participate

Sign Up

What happens if I sign up? We will match you to a research study center in your area that needs patients with atopic eczema or notify you when one becomes available. The study team will then contact you and you may have the opportunity to participate if qualified.


If you think you might like to participate in the UP0089 Study or would like more information, please enter your information below so we can see if you may qualify and can contact you about the study. Keep in mind that participation is entirely voluntary. If you do decide to take part in a study, you may change your mind about participating at any time.

About Atopic Eczema

Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema) is a condition that makes skin red and itchy. It is common in children but can occur at any age.

Atopic Dermatitis is one of the most common chronic skin conditions, affecting an estimated 1-3% of the adult population. This condition causes itching, redness, swelling, and dryness. The itch associated with atopic eczema can lead to open wounds leaving the skin vulnerable to infection, oozing, crusting, and other changes. 1,2

Atopic dermatitis, or atopic eczema, can be impacted by things that affect the skin’s barrier, (including genetics, environment, and inflammation), which impairs its ability to retain moisture and protect you against bacteria, allergens, and irritants.2 You may experience times where your skin ‘flares’ (when your atopic eczema is worse) and is in remission (when your skin is recovering).

Atopic dermatitis is usually found on the arms, legs, cheeks, and in the folds of the elbows and back of the knees, although anywhere on the body may be affected. The symptoms can be mild, moderate or severe and may include:3

  • Redness
  • Dry skin
  • Scaly skin
  • Itching
  • Cracked skin
  • Crusty sores

There is no cure for atopic dermatitis, although there are treatment options available. Some treatments that can help improve the symptoms of atopic dermatitis include topical medicated creams and ointments, barrier creams (to help moisturize and protect the skin barrier), light therapy, bleach baths, antibiotics taken orally and applied to the skin, as well as oral steroids and other immune suppressants.

References:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a research study?

A research study (also called a clinical trial) is a medical study that helps to answer important questions about an investigational drug – these may include how well an investigational study drug works for a certain condition. All medications must be tested in clinical research studies before they can be approved and prescribed to patients.

A research study is the process by which new and innovative medications, interventions and treatments are approved and brought to market. Even over-the-counter medications, such as NSAIDs, you may have used to counteract a headache, have gone through the clinical research study process before it was available at your local pharmacy.

The UP0089 Study is being done to assess how well an investigational medication works to treat patients with moderate to severe atopic eczema for whom previous treatments have not worked sufficiently.

The study drug is a monoclonal antibody. Monoclonal antibodies are proteins that recognize and bind specifically to certain other proteins in the body.

The study drug belongs to a group of medicines called interleukin (IL) inhibitors which reduce the activity of 2 proteins involved in atopic dermatitis.

This is a first-in-human study, which means that this is the first time that the study drug will be given to humans.

The UP0089 Study will enroll about 75 participants with atopic eczema at about 15 study centers across Europe.

If you are eligible to take part in this study, you will receive the investigational drug or placebo. A placebo is a “dummy treatment” that looks like the study drug but has no medicinally active ingredients.

You will receive the study drug or placebo in the form of an intravenous (IV) infusion in your arm over approximately 60 minutes. An intravenous or IV infusion is when the medication slowly drips into your vein over a set time. You will receive 6 doses of either the study drug or placebo in a 2:1 ratio (i.e., two thirds of participants will get study drug and one third will get placebo).

The study will include approximately 17 visits, including three overnight stays, to a study center in your location over about 26 weeks during participation.

Those who qualify to take part in the study can be reimbursed for travel costs and participation, where locally acceptable. Please discuss this with the study team when they contact you.

If you qualify, you will not have to pay for any study-related visits, tests, or investigational drug.

The study team will be able to explain more about what the UP0089 Study will involve, and it is up to you to decide if you want to take part. Participation in this study is voluntary. Whether or not you decide to participate in this study will not affect your current or future relationships with your doctors. If you decide to participate, you are free to withdraw at any time without affecting those relationships.

We match you to a study center within a close travel distance from your home. If we are not running the study in your area currently, with your permission, we will keep you in our database and reach out once a study in your area becomes available. If, at any time, you decided you no longer want your information stored, you can opt out and we will delete your details.

About the UP0089 Study

The UP0089 Study will enroll about 75 participants with atopic eczema at about 15 study centers across Europe.

The study will include approximately 17 visits, including three overnight stays, to a study center in your location over about 26 weeks during participation.

Participants will not have to pay for any study-related care or for the investigational medication.

Those who qualify to take part in the study can be reimbursed for their travel costs and participation, where locally acceptable.

The UP0089 Study is being done to assess how well an investigational medication works to treat patients with moderate to severe atopic eczema for whom previous treatments have not worked sufficiently.

Participate

Who can take part in the UP0089 Study?

You may qualify for the UP0089 Study if you:

  • Are between 18 and 65 years old
  • Have atopic eczema that covers 10% of your body (the palm of your hand is approximately 1% of your body’s surface area) and have had atopic eczema for at least 1 year
  • Have tried a topical (applied to the skin) atopic eczema treatment and have not had a sufficient response (your symptoms did not improve by at least 50%) OR you have been advised against using topical atopic eczema treatments.